Annotated Resource List

Part B: Annotated resource list

The topic selected was ‘Explorers and exploration’ to tie in with the PYP unit of inquiry being completed in year 3 and 4 next term. The resources are varied and cater for both teachers and students. The selection aids are in the bibliography -which I admit I have not edited from my assignment, so there are a few in there that hark back to Part C and Part A. Recovering from gastro today – so that’s how it is! My timing is perfect – luckily only had to do the citations/ references! Must be more organised next time and use more napalm in the bathroom.

Happy reading…

Aungst, G., M.Ed., & Zucker, L., M.Ed. (n.d.). All about explorers. Retrieved
March 27, 2014, from http://allaboutexplorers.com/

This is a teacher resource designed to highlight a key information literacy skill of website evaluation. The site appears to be bona fide but contains wildly inaccurate accounts of explorers. This website is clear in its aim to teachers, easy to access, interactive, fun and engaging. The pedagogy is current and apt for this group of learners and the school curriculum focus. The author’s biography firmly establishes their intellectual authority and teaching credentials. It is a fairly simple website but incredibly effective and engaging. A great start for teaching the pitfalls of sloppy research skills and it is iPad compatible – allowing students to ‘research’ and discover at their own pace. This resource was found using the social website ‘Pinterest’. Searching for people’s boards was time consuming and predominantly American content and perspectives were featured, which limits its usefulness in finding resources for the Australian curriculum. It is a growing resource with a greater number of Australian’s using it but overall frustrating to use in its limited search capacity.

BrainPOP Jr. – K-3 Educational Movies, Quizzes, Lessons, and More! (2012).
Retrieved from http://www.brainpopjr.com/

BrainPOP Jr. is a high quality interactive and fun website. It fills all the criteria suggested by Kathy Schrock (Schrock, 2012) in her website evaluation guideline. The content is well researched, engaging and authoritative, it is visually appealing and easy to navigate. It is self-directional for students to pace themselves and explore different facets of the ‘exploration’ topic – they can stop and start the video, take notes and choose to access weblinks, which are pitched at a variety of reading ages on their iPads. The video content is appropriate and provocative, enticing students to discuss and explore the ideas presented in further detail. Students access it easily through the school’s ‘One Login’ homepage. BrainPOP was a resource found through Common Sense Media, which is a recommended site from the IT personnel. It rates different websites, movies, books and games. The reviews are current, accurate, unbiased and helpful. The excellent search function allows easy searching for type of content, age range and subject range.

Britannica School. (2014). Retrieved March 27, 2014, from
http://school.eb.com.au/

The online encyclopaedia is authoritative, pedagogically sound and technologically dynamic – having been relaunched in 2013. It fits the demands of the curriculum extremely well and links to ACARA standards. The search element is multi-faceted and works on a student and teacher level. Students can read at their own level, creating their own reading list, save searches and print articles. Britannica supports one log in and is cost effective. Using the ‘Digital Criteria Selection’ guide from Edudemic, Britannica School fulfils every criteria. Edudemic’s selection criteria was perfect for the selection of this type of resource. Britannica School was recommended on the social network site ‘Scoopit!, which provided an excellent search function, with easy to follow links. There were many useful resources found through this website. All ‘scoops’ are tweeted or put on facebook for others to see which can be viewed as useful but also as annoying. There is no option to not publish the link to other social networking sites.

Gibbs, D. (2011). History: Knowledge, skills and understanding for historical
inquiry: Ages 8 – 10: All you need to teach. Melbourne, Vic.: Macmillan
Education Australia.

As a teacher resource this one is pertinent, high quality, linked to all relevant curriculum standards, supports guided inquiry based learning and written by educators with plenty of expertise in the field. It is contemporary and useful for staff providing text models, scaffolds and auditing the key historical concepts to be taught at this year level. As an Australian resource it represents indigenous Australian’s with respect and accuracy. This resource was presented to the library staff in a meeting with the publisher, who presented a selection of non-fiction humanities based resources. The presentation was comprehensive and useful to see the trends and strengths of one educational publishing firm. The range presented by Macmillan covered print, web and interactive resources too.

Kramer, S., & Wolf, E. (2004). Who was Ferdinand Magellan? New York: Grosset
& Dunlap.

As a guided reading resource, this text although published 10 years ago, is still current, engaging, and authoritative in its factual content. It completes the series of ‘Who was…’ and ‘Who is…’ books currently in circulation both in the library and as take-home readers in the classroom. Students have had the opportunity to read other titles in this continually expanding series. They particularly enjoy the structure of the books, especially its contemporary, entertaining style of writing with many illustrations peppered throughout. This text fits the unit of inquiry perfectly and engages students at their reading level. By giving them access to factual information in an entertaining format, it will pique their interest in explorers, lead to research using other resources. The selection aid for this text was both the recommendation of students who enjoy this factual narrative and the website Dogobooks. Providing reviews for children by children, this website is particularly useful for discovering which print titles they have both enjoyed and found useful in their research. It features both fiction and non-fiction texts. This was a patron driven acquisition.

Macleod, A. (2010). Explorers: Great tales of adventure and endurance. London:
DK in association with the Smithsonian Institution.

This text is current and authoritatively written, linking with both the Smithsonian Institution and Royal Geographical Society to provide a rich resource of stories, pictures, maps and informative illustrations/artwork. It is organised well – into five eras, importantly contains some first-person accounts and encompasses the stories of the companions and fellow travellers on some of the explorations. It has strong visual appeal and lends itself to the more capable reading cohort in the year level. It is a visually appealing text and will replace some of the more dated books in the collection. Googlebooks, with the subsequent links to both Book Verdict and Goodreads were used to find this text. Although a preview of this text was not provided, the reviews given provided a good idea of the quality, scope and suitability of the text. Googlebooks is easy to use and its links to other review websites provides a platform for diverse and useful reviews. Book Verdict is an excellent, although expensive resource but it does access many publications to provide its readers with up to date reviews. The facility to save, collate, link and share resources on both sites is excellent. Goodreads lends itself less to educational books/resources but the book-marking facility is useful.

Macinis, P. (2009) Australian backyard explorer. Retrieved 30 March, 2014
from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RF-Kpy05fWQ AND

The book Australian backyard explorer, is already owned by the school. It is an award winning book authoritatively presenting the experiences of the early Australian explorers in an engaging and age appropriate level to students, with special attention to the resourceful brilliance of the indigenous people. This book has been used before in this unit of inquiry. The Youtube video is selected in conjunction with the book as a stimulus for teachers. Here Peter Macinis discusses his motivation to write and retells his discoveries, including the close relationships forged between the explorers and the Aborigines and how they worked together to map, discover and chart the land. Teachers may also choose to show this video to the students in conjunction with the book as part of a non-fiction author study, although its dry nature, lack of interactivity and dated interview format fails the selection criteria chosen for students. These resources were found using SCAN. It contains a plethora of reviews by educators for high quality educational resources. The search function is wonderful. The large Australian content of literature, websites and general resources is impressive, and its funding by the NSW DET ensures that the reviews are not influenced by commercial interests, despite have advertisers on the site – Britannica being just one.

Murdie, R., & Nixon, C. (2013). Meet Captain Cook. North Sydney, NSW:
Random House Australia.

This is a delightful resource, full of factual information in a children’s picture book format. It is selected as an introductory resource and provocation for students to ponder the motivations, courage, personality and resolve of this famous explorer. It ties in with the PYP attitudes of ‘thinker’ and ‘risk-taker’, as well as providing a stimulus for further research and investigation into the discovery of Australia, which is the unit’s first line of inquiry. The illustrations are enticing, it is unambiguous, targeted at this age level and a new release. In this format it does not exhaustively cover the life of Captain Cook but fits the early stages of inquiry. This resource was found in Australian Publishers Association promotional online magazine called ‘ISSUU’ supported by a local book retailer, Books Illustrated. This selection aid is a basic way of finding out what is new in the publishing landscape in Australia but is limited to what the publishers wish to promote. It is a basic tool, worth a look to see if there are any resources featured which would fit in with the library’s collection gaps. This aid is more of an advertising springboard for further research using other more searchable resources such as Goodreads, Googlebooks or direct research on the publisher’s website.

The Navigators, ‘ Race of the navigators’, ABC Splash. Retrieved March 30, 2014, from abcspla.sh/m/29250

‘Race of the Navigators’ the first in a series of excellent videos produced by the ABC for this selected age range and fulfils the selection criteria well. This is an entertaining and engaging video, which can be viewed on the student’s iPads. The production quality is superb, and the scope of this series excellent. It gives in-depth historical context to the voyages and uses original paintings and drawings to bring the story to life. There are also clear links to other episodes in the series and a related website called ‘The Navigators’ – to explore individually after watching the video/s. This resource was found using Scootle – a truly enormous, all-encompassing selection aid. The ability to search for year level, Australian curriculum content descriptions, format, date of publication and age range is brilliant. Accessing the wealth of resources and ideas in the learning community is great, as is the tag search function and bookmarking facility. The ‘Learning Path’ capability is also hugely useful to create a resource for students to access independently. A truly valuable tool in selecting resources for all areas of the curriculum.

Ross, S., & Biesty, S. (2011). Into the unknown: How great explorers found their
way by land, sea, and air. Somerville, MA: Candlewick Press.

A dynamic and visually rich resource, which will entice the cohort of students who need intricate and detailed graphics to stimulate interest. This resource is a recently published, carefully researched and encompassing view of explorers (14 featured). It includes more recent explorations such as the moon landing and Mt. Everest, currently missing in the collection. Stewart Ross is an accomplished author who specialises in historical research, this is combined with the beautiful intricate illustrations from Stephen Biesty. This book lends itself to the student who pores over detail and engages slowly with a new topic. Two selection aids were used to find this resource – initially a subject search in SCAN revealed this as a possible resource, and looking in Goodreads enabled a thorough evaluation of the book, with 321 reviews found (Goodreads, 2014). SCAN’s search facility can be limited to a list of new publications, which was useful. Goodreads sheer volume of reviews both by educators, general public and students was useful in creating a diverse accurate picture of the quality of the publication.

Part C: Priorities and issues.

The priority for any library is to have an excellent collection development policy, derived from a thorough knowledge of all resources, the curriculum, the needs of its patrons and its future direction. From this document teacher librarians can deal with the formidable responsibility of meeting the educational needs of all learners, while charting a course into the future directions of a “technology driven information landscape.” (SCAN, 2012. p.29). It is fundamental in maintaining a current, on budget, up to date and relevant resource centre. It requires intense negotiation skills, an open, organised mind, constant vigilance across all developing areas of the curriculum and a constantly accessed learning network.

The library’s priority is to support learning in dynamic and relevant ways (Mitchell, P., 2011 p. 10). Selection issues arise as libraries transition between being storehouses to gateways (Fieldhouse, M. & Marshall, A. (Ed) 2012 p. 11) and attempt to accommodate the divide between the teaching staff and the millenials in terms of resource provision and format (Boon, L. (2008) p.177). As such, patron driven acquisition exemplifies the demands placed on the library in terms of budget, technological infrastructure and the differing priorities between students and teachers (Shen et.al. 2011 p.216) in choosing certain resources. Students prioritise their immediate needs and desires independent of the long term educational goals of the collection policy (Walters, W.H. 2012 p.199). Accessing resources through websites, ebooks, online subscriptions etc. via tablets, smartphones or computers places new demands on the library.

Collaboration must also be a priority (Fieldhouse, M. & Marshall, A. (Ed) 2012 p. 107). The library must work in a balance with the demands of its patrons while adhering to its budget and policy. Allowing students to determine some of the resources accessible in the library is essential, making it relevant and keeping the content dynamic (Fieldhouse, M. & Marshall, A. (Ed) 2012 p. 17). It is vital that staff have a significant input in the selection of resources. The learning networks teachers subscribe to feature a myriad of different resources, in an array of formats, selected to achieve their curriculum goals, while tailoring to the specific needs of their class. Prioritising their recommendations and marrying it with the policy of the library can only enhance the functionality of the library. Community opinions are diverse, provide some insurance against bias (Nimon, M. 2005 p.3) and add a greater balance and equality to the collection.

Budgetary parameters and restrictions are an unavoidable priority when resourcing the curriculum. Balancing the expenditure with new technological infrastructure, online resources, and in-depth coverage of all curriculum areas (Debowski, S. 2001 p.128) in a range of formats is essential. Gauging the purview of what the library budget entails is not such a simple task with the lines blurring between the IT department and library, as both combine to form information centres.

REFERENCES

Aungst, G., M.Ed., & Zucker, L., M.Ed. (n.d.). All about explorers. Retrieved
March 27, 2014, from http://allaboutexplorers.com/

Bailey,S. PYP Unit of Inquiry Planner – PYP Planning Documentation 2014 Firbank Grammar School ,February 2014

Books Illustrated. “‘Hello! from Australia’ 2014 Exhibition and Rights Catalogue:
Bologna Children’s Book Fair.” Issuu. Australian Publishers Association, 1
Mar. 2014. Web. 25 Mar. 2014.
.

Boon, L. (2008). “I want it all and I want it now!”: the changing face of school libraries. In J.
R. Kennedy, L. Vardaman & G. B. McCabe (Eds.), Our new public, a changing
clientele : bewildering issues or new challenges for managing libraries (pp. 173-177).
Westport, Conn.: Libraries Unlimited.

BrainPOP Jr. – K-3 Educational Movies, Quizzes, Lessons, and More! (2012).
Retrieved from http://www.brainpopjr.com/

“BrainPop.” Website Review. N.p., 2014. Web. 22 Mar. 2014.
.

Brisco, S. (2008). 10 BEST DIGITAL RESOURCES. School Library Journal, 54(5), 54.

Britannica School. (2014). Retrieved March 27, 2014, from
http://school.eb.com.au/

Debowski, S. (2001). Collection management policies. In K. Dillon, J. Henri & J. McGregor
(Eds.), Providing more with less : collection management for school libraries (2nd
ed.) (pp. 126-136). Wagga Wagga, NSW : Centre for Information Studies, Charles
Sturt University.

Dunn, Jeff. “The Teacher’s Guide To Choosing The Best Digital
Content.” Edudemic. N.p., 7 May 2013. Web. 27 March 2014.
.

“Explorers in Australia – ABC Splash.” Explorers in Australia – ABC Splash. N.p.,
2013. Web. 06 Apr. 2014.
.

“Explorers: Great Tales of Adventure and Endurance.” Goodreads. Goodreads Inc.,
2014. Web. 23 Mar. 2014.
.

“Explorers: Great Tales of Adventure and Endurance.” Google Books. Google, n.d.
Web. 23 Mar. 2014.
.

Fieldhouse, M., & Marshall, A. (2012). Collection development in the digital age. London:
Facet
Publishing.

Gibbs, D. (2011). History: Knowledge, skills and understanding for historical
inquiry: Ages 8 – 10: All you need to teach. Melbourne, Vic.: Macmillan
Education Australia.

Hughes-Hassell, S., & Mancall, J. C. (2005). Collection management for youth: Responding to the needs of learners: American Library Association.

“History.” The Australian Curriculum V6.0 Foundation to Year 10 Curriculum
by Rows. Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority,
Dec. 2010. Web. 05 Mar. 2014.
.

Johnson, P. (2009). Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management. Chicago: American Library Association.

Kramer, S., & Wolf, E. (2004). Who was Ferdinand Magellan? New York: Grosset
& Dunlap.

Macleod, A. (2010). Explorers: Great tales of adventure and endurance. London:
DK in association with the Smithsonian Institution.

Macinis, P. (2009) Australian backyard explorer. Retrieved 30 March, 2014
from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RF-Kpy05fWQ

Manager, Ms. “Scoop.it.” Scoop.it. N.p., 8 Nov. 2012. Web. 23 March, 2014.
.

Michell, P. ple’s Reading: The Line between Selection and
Censorship [online]. Access, Vol. 19, No. 2, June 2005: 25-26.

Mitchell, Pru. “Resourcing 21st Century Online Australian Curriculum: The Role
of School Libraries.” FYI, Autumn (2011): pp.10-15.

Neoncat. “Who Was Ferdinand Magellan?” DOGObooks. DOGO Media Inc., n.d.
Web. 22 Mar. 2014. .

“Race of the Navigators.” Scootle. Australian Government Department of
Education, 24 Mar. 2014. Web. 22 Mar. 2-14.
.

Ross, S., & Biesty, S. (2011). Into the unknown: How great explorers found their
way by land, sea, and air. Somerville, MA: Candlewick Press.

Shen, L., Cassidy, E. D., Elmore, E., Griffin, G., Manolovitz, T., Martinez, M., &
Turney, L. M. (2011). Head First into the Patron-Driven Acquisition Pool:
A Comparison of Librarian Selections Versus Patron Purchases. Journal of
Electronic Resources Librarianship, 23(3), 203-218.

DEC Scan Journal : 2014 Issue 1, Page 115. (2014). Retrieved March 23, 2014, from
http://scan.realviewdigital.com/?iid=89144&crd=0&searchKey=explorers#folio=115

“SCIS | Schools Catalogue Information Service.” SCIS | Schools Catalogue
Information Service. Education Services Australia, 2013. Web. 06 Apr.
2014. .

Schrock, Kathleen. “Critical Evaluation – Kathy Schrock’s Guide to
Everything.” Kathy Schrock’s Guide to Everything. N.p., 8 Feb. 2014. Web.
06 Apr. 2014. .

The Navigators, ‘ Race of the navigators’, ABC Splash. Retrieved March 30, 2014, from abcspla.sh/m/29250

Walters, W. H. (2012). Patron-Driven Acquisition and the Educational Mission of the Academic
Library. Library Resources & Technical Services, 56(3), 199-213.

Advertisements

About kblaich

I live in Melbourne, Australia, have one lovely husband, one delightful daughter, one bouncy son, lots of pets (2 dogs and 3 cats) and work at a primary school part time. I am currently studying my Masters in Teacher Librarianship through Charles Sturt University.
This entry was posted in ETL 503. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s