ETL 503 Assignment 2

Part B – Reflection

 

The use of ‘selection aids’ to resource a library was a key area of discovery.  I stated in my blog, “I was unaware until this unit of the possibilities of any library using Pinterest to curate content!” (Blaich, 2014).  Through further examination and reading I discovered the infinite resource of library-oriented voices on social media.  It became rapidly apparent that there was an immense reserve waiting to be tapped. Social media, viewed through the selection criteria and specific curriculum/patron demands of the school, have the potential to enrich the collection immensely.   Using this professional learning network does not replace “local judgement” (Hughes-Hassell & Mancall, p.48) and a plot summary, which does not analyse, synthesise or evaluate a text is not useful (Hughes-Hassell & Mancall, 2005, p.46) but if one wisely and widely selects from the “platforms and materials” (Palfrey, 2013, par.18) out there it can only enhance the selection process. Having such a rich professional resource, extending and embracing the wealth of information available enhances the school library collection (Bayliss, 2013, par.15).  Social media’s inter-connectivity has an incredibly positive influence if thoughtfully applied and the essential role of the library is to connect people to resources.  As I have learnt we lead by example developing, embracing and nurturing “new types of learning communities” (O’Connell, 2012, par. 8).

 

A significant issue for teacher librarians, and one which I under-estimated is the issue of copyright and how it directly affects the role of the teacher librarian.  I commented, “There is so much to learn about copyright! A veritable minefield.” (Blaich, 2014) Being aware of DRM and its role in “managing downstream rights” (Iannella, 2008, p.2) is key to understanding what one can do with e-resources – copying, printing and transmitting.  A teacher librarian is placed in the role of promoting and educating staff and students on copyright, especially digital resources (ASLA, 2014, par. 5).  Creative commons, has become the most useful tool for students, where they can easily see how they can use a resource, if at all.  Digital natives have a passion for uploading, copying, and sharing with impunity.  They require as a matter of course an education in copyright and it helps if they see this through the point of view of a creator (Valenza & Johnson, 2009, par.12). Smartcopying and the Creative Commons website are critical to read and disseminate in schools – this an area of the teacher librarian’s role that is not so obvious but essential.

 

 

 

The rapid changing trends in technology and ubiquitous access to information is a major issue for libraries; “to resource the students with a balanced reading environment – not only from fiction to non-fiction but across all platforms, devices” (Blaich, 2014) is challenging. Learning about the scale of this technological change, how this affects school libraries and in particular how the collection is affected was significant.  The IFLA Trend report (IFLA, 2013) highlights the need for information literacy and questions the roles of the library in joining patrons and information together.  The provision of digital resources is a significant issue facing libraries – ebooks, the platforms used to access the resources and the minefield of licences and regulations that surround these items. Libraries have to consider not only what titles are provided to their clientele but also the cost of supporting an e-lending technological infrastructure (ALIA 2014 p.31) and how they make these demands known to management.  The variety and requirements of so many different technologies is a key issue now and going forward for school libraries.

 

 

References

ASLA (2014) Policy Statement – School Library Bill of Rights. In ASLA- AustralianSchool Library Association.  Retrieved from http://www.asla.org.au/policy/bill-of-rights.aspx

Bayliss, S. (2013, December 13). Librarians Use Social Networking Professionally More than Teachers and Principals, According to Report – The Digital Shift. Retrieved May 21, 2014, from http://www.thedigitalshift.com/2012/12/k-12/librarians-use-social-networking-professionally-more-than-teachers-and-principals-according-to-report/

Blaich, K. (2014) “Re: Libraries Curating on Social Media.” Web log Kblaich@wordpress.com. N.p., 17 Mar. 2014. Retrieved from: https://kblaich.wordpress.com/2014/03/17/libraries-curating-on-social-media/

Blaich, K (2014, April 21) Copyright questions [Online forum comment]  Retrieved from: http://interact.csu.edu.au/portal/site/ETL503_201430_W_D/page/7811535f-7379-4999-007a-e8f8c8a01189

Blaich,K (2014) “Re: ETL 503” Web log comment. Kblaich@wordpress.com. N.p., 3Mar. 2014. Retrieved from: https://kblaich.wordpress.com/2014/03/03/etl-503/

IFLA (2013) IFLA Trend report. Retrieved from http://trends.ifla.org/

Hughes-Hassell, S., & Mancall, J. C. (2005). Collection management for youth: Responding to the needs of learners: American Library Association.

Iannella, R. (2008) Digital Rights Management Technology.  Retrieved from         http://www.nicta.com.au/pub?doc=764

Mount, D. (2014) Elending landscape report. Retrieved from Australian Library and Information Service website: https://www.alia.org.au/sites/default/files/publishing/ALIA-Elending-Landscape-Report-2014_0.pdf

O’Connell, J.  (2012) Building a vibrant future for school library collections. In SCIS Connections. Retrieved 21 May 2014 from http://www2.curriculum.edu.au/scis/connections/issue_83_2012/articles/building_a_vibrant_future.html

Palfrey, J. (2013) The DPLA and School Libraries: Partners Focused on Digital-          EraLearners.  Retrieved 22 May 2014 http://www.thedigitalshift.com/2013/01/digital-libraries/the-dpla-and-school-libraries-partners-focused-on-digital-era-learners/

Valenza, J. & Johnstone, D. 2010 Things that keep us up at night. In SCIS Connections, Issue 73. Retrieved from: http://www2.curriculum.edu.au/scis/connections/things_that_keep_us_up_at_night.html

 

 

 

 

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Elephants.

Elephants live in extremely cold habitats. They are covered in purple fur and have large purple ears to keep themselves warm. Elephants lay large purple eggs which they keep safe and warm in huge nests, which they build out of straw, wool jumpers, cotton wool balls and ikea furniture (Eksnarp Sofas especially). They wrap their large ears around them to keep them warm when it snows. Elephants have to be very carefull when they sit on their eggs to make sure they do not squash them with their large bodies. The sit down very carefully.

Elephants love to eat sausages and have to go out to find them every day. They usually go out in small groups and leave some elephants behind to look after the eggs and the nests. They find the sausages in many different places but like to go to supermarkets, where it is warm and the sausages are really good. When they find great sausages they often ring each other on their mobile phones to let others know. They then buy their sausages and take them home.

Elephants like to cook their sausages, rather than having them raw. They microwave them because they are worried that the fat might splatter on their fur if they fried them.

Elephants drink water, not fizzy drinks because their trunks might get a bit tickly. They do not like chocolate, it gives them gas.

Many years ago elephants were hunted for their purple fur, which people used to make shagpile carpets and coats. This is now banned. Elephants are now safe.

Elephants love to sing and often enter competitions. One elephant recently won a competition in the Pachyderm’s Got Talent competititon and is touring America with her hit song ‘Elephant Schmelephant A Bellyphant Baby”. They are very outgoing creatures.

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Collection Development Policies

In a school with no current collection development policy, it is becoming increasingly important how vital this is to the management of the library. The collection development policy broad and public (Charles Sturt University 2014) is a basic requirement delineating publically the guiding principles/philosophy, the aims to provide a balanced collection, selection criteria and the tools used, broad areas of responsibility for the staff, and what happens when a resource is challenged. It hints at the deeper policy documents which carefully outline and guide procedures to ensure the CDP occurs smoothly.

One such CDP found online is a particularly good example in that it is clear, succinct (lots of dot points) and thorough.

http://blogs.wab.edu/eslibrary/files/2013/02/WAB-Collection-and-Selection-Guidelines1.pdf

The section at the end about donations is also incredibly useful, in that it harks back to the all important selection criteria.

In ALIA’s ‘Statement of Professional Conduct” #5 is interesting: “distinguishing in their actions and statements between their personal viewpoints and those of the library and information service that employs them or the Australian Library and Information Association;” (ALIA, 2014) Without a collection development policy and the essential policy documents, which would accompany it, there is a possibility of blurring between dominant voices in the library swaying elements of the collection. The individual/s would potentially fill the void. A clear CDP establishes the library in its own right, collaboratively written, agreed upon and anchored in sound pedagogy/influence of wider academic strictures.

This year I intend to write such a collection development policy – but although I will be the person to draft it, drawing on the critical information and resources found during this course, it will be a collaborative effort – discussed, debated and reviewed by all the key stakeholders in the library – principal, cross campus library staff, library technicians, subject coordinators and teachers.

The openness of this document will communicate to the wider community the rational thinking, accountability and rational nature of such an important school resource. It will also serve to promote the library.

The policy documentation which will inevitably follow will be based on this foundation and similarly vetted by a broad committee.

Participating in this course and specifically examining the areas of CDP has crystalised in my mind the crucial nature of having this guidance on paper to refer to and build from. It benefits all who use, associate and work in the library.

ALIA Statement of Professional Conduct. 2014 Retrieved 20 May 2014 https://www.alia.org.au/about-alia/policies-standards-and-guidelines/statement-professional-conduct

 

Charles Sturt University. 2014. Collection Management Policy (ETL503
Module 6.1 & 6.2). Retrieved May 12, 2014, from Charles Sturt
University website http://interact.csu.edu.au/portal/site/ETL503_201430_W_D/page/107347c1-3a72-453a-8091-13f98fefcf2c

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Curriculum Development Policy

In a school with no current collection development policy, it is becoming increasingly important how vital this is to the management of the library. The collection development policy broad and public (Charles Sturt University 2014) is a basic requirement delineating publically the guiding principles/philosophy, the aims to provide a balanced collection, selection criteria and the tools used, broad areas of responsibility for the staff, and what happens when a resource is challenged. It hints at the deeper policy documents which carefully outline and guide procedures to ensure the CDP occurs smoothly.

One such CDP found online is a particularly good example in that it is clear, succinct (lots of dot points) and thorough.

http://blogs.wab.edu/eslibrary/files/2013/02/WAB-Collection-and-Selection-Guidelines1.pdf

The section at the end about donations is also incredibly useful, in that it harks back to the all important selection criteria.

In ALIA’s ‘Statement of Professional Conduct” #5 is interesting: “distinguishing in their actions and statements between their personal viewpoints and those of the library and information service that employs them or the Australian Library and Information Association;” (ALIA, 2014) Without a collection development policy and the essential policy documents, which would accompany it, there is a possibility of blurring between dominant voices in the library swaying elements of the collection. The individual/s would potentially fill the void. A clear CDP establishes the library in its own right, collaboratively written, agreed upon and anchored in sound pedagogy/influence of wider academic strictures.

This year I intend to write such a collection development policy – but although I will be the person to draft it, drawing on the critical information and resources found during this course, it will be a collaborative effort – discussed, debated and reviewed by all the key stakeholders in the library – principal, cross campus library staff, library technicians, subject coordinators and teachers.

The openness of this document will communicate to the wider community the rational thinking, accountability and rational nature of such an important school resource. It will also serve to promote the library.

The policy documentation which will inevitably follow will be based on this foundation and similarly vetted by a broad committee.

Participating in this course and specifically examining the areas of CDP has crystalised in my mind the crucial nature of having this guidance on paper to refer to and build from. It benefits all who use, associate and work in the library.

ALIA Statement of Professional Conduct. 2014 Retrieved 20 May 2014 https://www.alia.org.au/about-alia/policies-standards-and-guidelines/statement-professional-conduct

 

Charles Sturt University. 2014. Collection Management Policy (ETL503
Module 6.1 & 6.2). Retrieved May 12, 2014, from Charles Sturt
University website http://interact.csu.edu.au/portal/site/ETL503_201430_W_D/page/107347c1-3a72-453a-8091-13f98fefcf2c

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Annotated Resource List

Part B: Annotated resource list

The topic selected was ‘Explorers and exploration’ to tie in with the PYP unit of inquiry being completed in year 3 and 4 next term. The resources are varied and cater for both teachers and students. The selection aids are in the bibliography -which I admit I have not edited from my assignment, so there are a few in there that hark back to Part C and Part A. Recovering from gastro today – so that’s how it is! My timing is perfect – luckily only had to do the citations/ references! Must be more organised next time and use more napalm in the bathroom.

Happy reading…

Aungst, G., M.Ed., & Zucker, L., M.Ed. (n.d.). All about explorers. Retrieved
March 27, 2014, from http://allaboutexplorers.com/

This is a teacher resource designed to highlight a key information literacy skill of website evaluation. The site appears to be bona fide but contains wildly inaccurate accounts of explorers. This website is clear in its aim to teachers, easy to access, interactive, fun and engaging. The pedagogy is current and apt for this group of learners and the school curriculum focus. The author’s biography firmly establishes their intellectual authority and teaching credentials. It is a fairly simple website but incredibly effective and engaging. A great start for teaching the pitfalls of sloppy research skills and it is iPad compatible – allowing students to ‘research’ and discover at their own pace. This resource was found using the social website ‘Pinterest’. Searching for people’s boards was time consuming and predominantly American content and perspectives were featured, which limits its usefulness in finding resources for the Australian curriculum. It is a growing resource with a greater number of Australian’s using it but overall frustrating to use in its limited search capacity.

BrainPOP Jr. – K-3 Educational Movies, Quizzes, Lessons, and More! (2012).
Retrieved from http://www.brainpopjr.com/

BrainPOP Jr. is a high quality interactive and fun website. It fills all the criteria suggested by Kathy Schrock (Schrock, 2012) in her website evaluation guideline. The content is well researched, engaging and authoritative, it is visually appealing and easy to navigate. It is self-directional for students to pace themselves and explore different facets of the ‘exploration’ topic – they can stop and start the video, take notes and choose to access weblinks, which are pitched at a variety of reading ages on their iPads. The video content is appropriate and provocative, enticing students to discuss and explore the ideas presented in further detail. Students access it easily through the school’s ‘One Login’ homepage. BrainPOP was a resource found through Common Sense Media, which is a recommended site from the IT personnel. It rates different websites, movies, books and games. The reviews are current, accurate, unbiased and helpful. The excellent search function allows easy searching for type of content, age range and subject range.

Britannica School. (2014). Retrieved March 27, 2014, from
http://school.eb.com.au/

The online encyclopaedia is authoritative, pedagogically sound and technologically dynamic – having been relaunched in 2013. It fits the demands of the curriculum extremely well and links to ACARA standards. The search element is multi-faceted and works on a student and teacher level. Students can read at their own level, creating their own reading list, save searches and print articles. Britannica supports one log in and is cost effective. Using the ‘Digital Criteria Selection’ guide from Edudemic, Britannica School fulfils every criteria. Edudemic’s selection criteria was perfect for the selection of this type of resource. Britannica School was recommended on the social network site ‘Scoopit!, which provided an excellent search function, with easy to follow links. There were many useful resources found through this website. All ‘scoops’ are tweeted or put on facebook for others to see which can be viewed as useful but also as annoying. There is no option to not publish the link to other social networking sites.

Gibbs, D. (2011). History: Knowledge, skills and understanding for historical
inquiry: Ages 8 – 10: All you need to teach. Melbourne, Vic.: Macmillan
Education Australia.

As a teacher resource this one is pertinent, high quality, linked to all relevant curriculum standards, supports guided inquiry based learning and written by educators with plenty of expertise in the field. It is contemporary and useful for staff providing text models, scaffolds and auditing the key historical concepts to be taught at this year level. As an Australian resource it represents indigenous Australian’s with respect and accuracy. This resource was presented to the library staff in a meeting with the publisher, who presented a selection of non-fiction humanities based resources. The presentation was comprehensive and useful to see the trends and strengths of one educational publishing firm. The range presented by Macmillan covered print, web and interactive resources too.

Kramer, S., & Wolf, E. (2004). Who was Ferdinand Magellan? New York: Grosset
& Dunlap.

As a guided reading resource, this text although published 10 years ago, is still current, engaging, and authoritative in its factual content. It completes the series of ‘Who was…’ and ‘Who is…’ books currently in circulation both in the library and as take-home readers in the classroom. Students have had the opportunity to read other titles in this continually expanding series. They particularly enjoy the structure of the books, especially its contemporary, entertaining style of writing with many illustrations peppered throughout. This text fits the unit of inquiry perfectly and engages students at their reading level. By giving them access to factual information in an entertaining format, it will pique their interest in explorers, lead to research using other resources. The selection aid for this text was both the recommendation of students who enjoy this factual narrative and the website Dogobooks. Providing reviews for children by children, this website is particularly useful for discovering which print titles they have both enjoyed and found useful in their research. It features both fiction and non-fiction texts. This was a patron driven acquisition.

Macleod, A. (2010). Explorers: Great tales of adventure and endurance. London:
DK in association with the Smithsonian Institution.

This text is current and authoritatively written, linking with both the Smithsonian Institution and Royal Geographical Society to provide a rich resource of stories, pictures, maps and informative illustrations/artwork. It is organised well – into five eras, importantly contains some first-person accounts and encompasses the stories of the companions and fellow travellers on some of the explorations. It has strong visual appeal and lends itself to the more capable reading cohort in the year level. It is a visually appealing text and will replace some of the more dated books in the collection. Googlebooks, with the subsequent links to both Book Verdict and Goodreads were used to find this text. Although a preview of this text was not provided, the reviews given provided a good idea of the quality, scope and suitability of the text. Googlebooks is easy to use and its links to other review websites provides a platform for diverse and useful reviews. Book Verdict is an excellent, although expensive resource but it does access many publications to provide its readers with up to date reviews. The facility to save, collate, link and share resources on both sites is excellent. Goodreads lends itself less to educational books/resources but the book-marking facility is useful.

Macinis, P. (2009) Australian backyard explorer. Retrieved 30 March, 2014
from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RF-Kpy05fWQ AND

The book Australian backyard explorer, is already owned by the school. It is an award winning book authoritatively presenting the experiences of the early Australian explorers in an engaging and age appropriate level to students, with special attention to the resourceful brilliance of the indigenous people. This book has been used before in this unit of inquiry. The Youtube video is selected in conjunction with the book as a stimulus for teachers. Here Peter Macinis discusses his motivation to write and retells his discoveries, including the close relationships forged between the explorers and the Aborigines and how they worked together to map, discover and chart the land. Teachers may also choose to show this video to the students in conjunction with the book as part of a non-fiction author study, although its dry nature, lack of interactivity and dated interview format fails the selection criteria chosen for students. These resources were found using SCAN. It contains a plethora of reviews by educators for high quality educational resources. The search function is wonderful. The large Australian content of literature, websites and general resources is impressive, and its funding by the NSW DET ensures that the reviews are not influenced by commercial interests, despite have advertisers on the site – Britannica being just one.

Murdie, R., & Nixon, C. (2013). Meet Captain Cook. North Sydney, NSW:
Random House Australia.

This is a delightful resource, full of factual information in a children’s picture book format. It is selected as an introductory resource and provocation for students to ponder the motivations, courage, personality and resolve of this famous explorer. It ties in with the PYP attitudes of ‘thinker’ and ‘risk-taker’, as well as providing a stimulus for further research and investigation into the discovery of Australia, which is the unit’s first line of inquiry. The illustrations are enticing, it is unambiguous, targeted at this age level and a new release. In this format it does not exhaustively cover the life of Captain Cook but fits the early stages of inquiry. This resource was found in Australian Publishers Association promotional online magazine called ‘ISSUU’ supported by a local book retailer, Books Illustrated. This selection aid is a basic way of finding out what is new in the publishing landscape in Australia but is limited to what the publishers wish to promote. It is a basic tool, worth a look to see if there are any resources featured which would fit in with the library’s collection gaps. This aid is more of an advertising springboard for further research using other more searchable resources such as Goodreads, Googlebooks or direct research on the publisher’s website.

The Navigators, ‘ Race of the navigators’, ABC Splash. Retrieved March 30, 2014, from abcspla.sh/m/29250

‘Race of the Navigators’ the first in a series of excellent videos produced by the ABC for this selected age range and fulfils the selection criteria well. This is an entertaining and engaging video, which can be viewed on the student’s iPads. The production quality is superb, and the scope of this series excellent. It gives in-depth historical context to the voyages and uses original paintings and drawings to bring the story to life. There are also clear links to other episodes in the series and a related website called ‘The Navigators’ – to explore individually after watching the video/s. This resource was found using Scootle – a truly enormous, all-encompassing selection aid. The ability to search for year level, Australian curriculum content descriptions, format, date of publication and age range is brilliant. Accessing the wealth of resources and ideas in the learning community is great, as is the tag search function and bookmarking facility. The ‘Learning Path’ capability is also hugely useful to create a resource for students to access independently. A truly valuable tool in selecting resources for all areas of the curriculum.

Ross, S., & Biesty, S. (2011). Into the unknown: How great explorers found their
way by land, sea, and air. Somerville, MA: Candlewick Press.

A dynamic and visually rich resource, which will entice the cohort of students who need intricate and detailed graphics to stimulate interest. This resource is a recently published, carefully researched and encompassing view of explorers (14 featured). It includes more recent explorations such as the moon landing and Mt. Everest, currently missing in the collection. Stewart Ross is an accomplished author who specialises in historical research, this is combined with the beautiful intricate illustrations from Stephen Biesty. This book lends itself to the student who pores over detail and engages slowly with a new topic. Two selection aids were used to find this resource – initially a subject search in SCAN revealed this as a possible resource, and looking in Goodreads enabled a thorough evaluation of the book, with 321 reviews found (Goodreads, 2014). SCAN’s search facility can be limited to a list of new publications, which was useful. Goodreads sheer volume of reviews both by educators, general public and students was useful in creating a diverse accurate picture of the quality of the publication.

Part C: Priorities and issues.

The priority for any library is to have an excellent collection development policy, derived from a thorough knowledge of all resources, the curriculum, the needs of its patrons and its future direction. From this document teacher librarians can deal with the formidable responsibility of meeting the educational needs of all learners, while charting a course into the future directions of a “technology driven information landscape.” (SCAN, 2012. p.29). It is fundamental in maintaining a current, on budget, up to date and relevant resource centre. It requires intense negotiation skills, an open, organised mind, constant vigilance across all developing areas of the curriculum and a constantly accessed learning network.

The library’s priority is to support learning in dynamic and relevant ways (Mitchell, P., 2011 p. 10). Selection issues arise as libraries transition between being storehouses to gateways (Fieldhouse, M. & Marshall, A. (Ed) 2012 p. 11) and attempt to accommodate the divide between the teaching staff and the millenials in terms of resource provision and format (Boon, L. (2008) p.177). As such, patron driven acquisition exemplifies the demands placed on the library in terms of budget, technological infrastructure and the differing priorities between students and teachers (Shen et.al. 2011 p.216) in choosing certain resources. Students prioritise their immediate needs and desires independent of the long term educational goals of the collection policy (Walters, W.H. 2012 p.199). Accessing resources through websites, ebooks, online subscriptions etc. via tablets, smartphones or computers places new demands on the library.

Collaboration must also be a priority (Fieldhouse, M. & Marshall, A. (Ed) 2012 p. 107). The library must work in a balance with the demands of its patrons while adhering to its budget and policy. Allowing students to determine some of the resources accessible in the library is essential, making it relevant and keeping the content dynamic (Fieldhouse, M. & Marshall, A. (Ed) 2012 p. 17). It is vital that staff have a significant input in the selection of resources. The learning networks teachers subscribe to feature a myriad of different resources, in an array of formats, selected to achieve their curriculum goals, while tailoring to the specific needs of their class. Prioritising their recommendations and marrying it with the policy of the library can only enhance the functionality of the library. Community opinions are diverse, provide some insurance against bias (Nimon, M. 2005 p.3) and add a greater balance and equality to the collection.

Budgetary parameters and restrictions are an unavoidable priority when resourcing the curriculum. Balancing the expenditure with new technological infrastructure, online resources, and in-depth coverage of all curriculum areas (Debowski, S. 2001 p.128) in a range of formats is essential. Gauging the purview of what the library budget entails is not such a simple task with the lines blurring between the IT department and library, as both combine to form information centres.

REFERENCES

Aungst, G., M.Ed., & Zucker, L., M.Ed. (n.d.). All about explorers. Retrieved
March 27, 2014, from http://allaboutexplorers.com/

Bailey,S. PYP Unit of Inquiry Planner – PYP Planning Documentation 2014 Firbank Grammar School ,February 2014

Books Illustrated. “‘Hello! from Australia’ 2014 Exhibition and Rights Catalogue:
Bologna Children’s Book Fair.” Issuu. Australian Publishers Association, 1
Mar. 2014. Web. 25 Mar. 2014.
.

Boon, L. (2008). “I want it all and I want it now!”: the changing face of school libraries. In J.
R. Kennedy, L. Vardaman & G. B. McCabe (Eds.), Our new public, a changing
clientele : bewildering issues or new challenges for managing libraries (pp. 173-177).
Westport, Conn.: Libraries Unlimited.

BrainPOP Jr. – K-3 Educational Movies, Quizzes, Lessons, and More! (2012).
Retrieved from http://www.brainpopjr.com/

“BrainPop.” Website Review. N.p., 2014. Web. 22 Mar. 2014.
.

Brisco, S. (2008). 10 BEST DIGITAL RESOURCES. School Library Journal, 54(5), 54.

Britannica School. (2014). Retrieved March 27, 2014, from
http://school.eb.com.au/

Debowski, S. (2001). Collection management policies. In K. Dillon, J. Henri & J. McGregor
(Eds.), Providing more with less : collection management for school libraries (2nd
ed.) (pp. 126-136). Wagga Wagga, NSW : Centre for Information Studies, Charles
Sturt University.

Dunn, Jeff. “The Teacher’s Guide To Choosing The Best Digital
Content.” Edudemic. N.p., 7 May 2013. Web. 27 March 2014.
.

“Explorers in Australia – ABC Splash.” Explorers in Australia – ABC Splash. N.p.,
2013. Web. 06 Apr. 2014.
.

“Explorers: Great Tales of Adventure and Endurance.” Goodreads. Goodreads Inc.,
2014. Web. 23 Mar. 2014.
.

“Explorers: Great Tales of Adventure and Endurance.” Google Books. Google, n.d.
Web. 23 Mar. 2014.
.

Fieldhouse, M., & Marshall, A. (2012). Collection development in the digital age. London:
Facet
Publishing.

Gibbs, D. (2011). History: Knowledge, skills and understanding for historical
inquiry: Ages 8 – 10: All you need to teach. Melbourne, Vic.: Macmillan
Education Australia.

Hughes-Hassell, S., & Mancall, J. C. (2005). Collection management for youth: Responding to the needs of learners: American Library Association.

“History.” The Australian Curriculum V6.0 Foundation to Year 10 Curriculum
by Rows. Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority,
Dec. 2010. Web. 05 Mar. 2014.
.

Johnson, P. (2009). Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management. Chicago: American Library Association.

Kramer, S., & Wolf, E. (2004). Who was Ferdinand Magellan? New York: Grosset
& Dunlap.

Macleod, A. (2010). Explorers: Great tales of adventure and endurance. London:
DK in association with the Smithsonian Institution.

Macinis, P. (2009) Australian backyard explorer. Retrieved 30 March, 2014
from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RF-Kpy05fWQ

Manager, Ms. “Scoop.it.” Scoop.it. N.p., 8 Nov. 2012. Web. 23 March, 2014.
.

Michell, P. ple’s Reading: The Line between Selection and
Censorship [online]. Access, Vol. 19, No. 2, June 2005: 25-26.

Mitchell, Pru. “Resourcing 21st Century Online Australian Curriculum: The Role
of School Libraries.” FYI, Autumn (2011): pp.10-15.

Neoncat. “Who Was Ferdinand Magellan?” DOGObooks. DOGO Media Inc., n.d.
Web. 22 Mar. 2014. .

“Race of the Navigators.” Scootle. Australian Government Department of
Education, 24 Mar. 2014. Web. 22 Mar. 2-14.
.

Ross, S., & Biesty, S. (2011). Into the unknown: How great explorers found their
way by land, sea, and air. Somerville, MA: Candlewick Press.

Shen, L., Cassidy, E. D., Elmore, E., Griffin, G., Manolovitz, T., Martinez, M., &
Turney, L. M. (2011). Head First into the Patron-Driven Acquisition Pool:
A Comparison of Librarian Selections Versus Patron Purchases. Journal of
Electronic Resources Librarianship, 23(3), 203-218.

DEC Scan Journal : 2014 Issue 1, Page 115. (2014). Retrieved March 23, 2014, from
http://scan.realviewdigital.com/?iid=89144&crd=0&searchKey=explorers#folio=115

“SCIS | Schools Catalogue Information Service.” SCIS | Schools Catalogue
Information Service. Education Services Australia, 2013. Web. 06 Apr.
2014. .

Schrock, Kathleen. “Critical Evaluation – Kathy Schrock’s Guide to
Everything.” Kathy Schrock’s Guide to Everything. N.p., 8 Feb. 2014. Web.
06 Apr. 2014. .

The Navigators, ‘ Race of the navigators’, ABC Splash. Retrieved March 30, 2014, from abcspla.sh/m/29250

Walters, W. H. (2012). Patron-Driven Acquisition and the Educational Mission of the Academic
Library. Library Resources & Technical Services, 56(3), 199-213.

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www.goodreads.com

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Libraries curating on social media

I am a devotee to Pinterest and love collecting and pinning things to my boards – I have lots of things on my ‘Education’ board and have just started to pin library things too. I was unaware until this unit of the possibilities of any library using Pinterest to curate content! Very excited and I will investigate further. I did however sign up to Tumblr – there are often links between the two websites – so I signed up (the list of things that I am signed up for is getting ridiculous- flickr, diigo, edmodo, 21fluency, feedly… to name a few oh and scootle of course!). The State Library of NSW has an excellent blog, which uploads the key areas it is highlighting – HSC links today. When you click on the blog you are taken to their website, which is nothing short of terrific – so many different things to use, investigate and inspire. Amazing. The resources to be found are terrific – secondary and primary. Now I am off to Pinterest to see what I can find but I am hoping that I don’t get distracted!

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ETL 503

It has been fascinating to read the publishing perspective from Shatzkin.  As a teacher we often just focus on learning outcomes, lesson plans and the resources available to us rather than manipulating, choosing and taking the risk on those resources – which of course is the domain of the teacher librarian!

 

I think there were a few key points:

The owner of the platform is a gatekeeper – so Kindle ‘owns’ the consumer not the publisher and the power play there has reversed.

Parental control is being offered by publishing houses in regard to ebooks – Storia, Ruckus, RRKids etc.

The lack of easy translation of non-immersive books to a digital format

 

If we combine Shatzkin with the commentary of Doug Johnstone it becomes really interesting.

 

If there is no easy transition for publishers of non-immersive text and kids are reading predominantly non-fiction text as they gather reading momentum through the school – it must mean that they are accessing the vast majority from websites rather than a specific edited, constructed and deliberately put together text.  Information literacy has never been so critical then!

The emphasis on us as teacher librarians to resource the students with a balanced reading environment – not only from fiction to non-fiction but across all platforms, devices and in all areas makes for a challenging job description!

I have to say though, that I am really interested to see what comes out of these mega merges between Random House and Penguin and how they are going to change our reading world to incorporate non-immersive texts using different devices and how that will tie in with a post-literate society. 

And in regard to the post-literate society – it does blow my mind to think that we could live in a society which feasibly wouldn’t have the need for books, keyboards, writing etc (I need these like oxygen!).  There was once a time when it was all face to face, oral storytelling tradition – imagine their listening skills, interpersonal skills, memory recall and attention to aural detail!

Food for thought.

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Part B – Critical Reflection

The journey through ETL 401 has been decidedly interesting (partly terrifying) and very much an illuminating experience!  Originally I saw myself in the library accessioning books, managing library resources, purchasing, completing audits, liaising with teaching staff on their resource requirements, and having cosy (traditional) literacy based lessons where new books, genres and ideas were discussed.  My view was a tad dated – I had practically purchased the chain for my glasses, twin set & pearls and was indeed practising my most authoritative “Shhh!” when I started to read …

 

 

Plunging in at the beginning of the course to view Kirsten Purcell’s Imagining a library of (the not too distant) future (Purcell, K. 2012) was eye opening.  This library paradigm had very little with to do with my preconceived notions of how libraries operate and what the role of teacher librarians (TL) are.

 

Thomas Frey’s article, similarly shook my view but I was excited by the concept of libraries becoming evolving ‘creative spaces’ (Frey n.d. par 42).  A combination of Joyce Valenza’s ‘Revised Manifesto’ and Buffy Hamilton’s blog “What kind of teacher are you?”  gave me real insight into the possibilities of what a teacher librarian could do with ‘trending’ information resources and school-wide collaboration.

 

 

Inspired with Valenza’s concept of the library providing 24/7 access to information and practical guidance (Valenza 2010) I went in search of both of my school librarians (senior and junior school).  They have embraced and changed their libraries/practise to embrace the current developments in information literacy.  Looking at the flexible scheduling in the junior school, the provision of ebooks in the senior school, liaising with the management team, I felt decidedly out of my depth – I was at Kuhlthau’s ‘exploration’ stage (Kuhlthau, Maniotes & Caspari 2007 p. 19) and wrote in my blog about climbing a mountain of information and not knowing what I didn’t know! (Blaich 2013 a) 

 

I was similarly excited by the idea of transforming libraries into ‘learning commons’ (Hay 2010) a brilliant and necessary idea.  The library should indeed be a mutable hub of activity where students and teachers can direct the use of the space.  Indeed, I discovered that librarians are now in charge of “flexible and dynamic learning laboratories” (Hay 2006) rather than warehouses for printed material (Bennett 2009) within my school!

 

In the 2.1 forum I perceived the main roles of TL as being a resource manager, to teach resource skills and to monitor information technology use (Blaich 2013 b). I was to learn about how the TL’s role is being reframed and brought into a new 21st century paradigm (Purcell, M. 2010) and with excitement learnt about the ‘Millennial’s’ (Lippincott 2012 p.539) and the concept of ‘transliteracy’ (Thomas et. al 2010).  I chose that as a topic in my ‘Blog Task 1’ but have since realised that perhaps the role of the TL is not just to embody transliteracy! (Blaich 2013 c)

 

The fundamental roles of planning, collaboration and advocacy were a mystery to me at the beginning of the course.  I discovered how the TL should be an integral part of the planning process.  Involvement at the curriculum development stage results in teachers being aware of the considerable human, print, digital (etc.) resources available to them in the library.  Haycock points out that collaboration with the TL is fundamental to positive student achievement (Haycock 2007 p. 32) and Gilman directs TL’s in four key areas to become highly effective, one of which is collaboration (Gilman 2002 par. 22).  TL’s are also mandated to be the advocate of the library within a school to maintain its central and vital position (Oberg 2006 p.17).

 

The leadership role TL’s have within a school was similarly a new-to-me concept and I was intrigued at the potential of their influence in shaping the curriculum.  Teacher librarians are an asset in co-constructing the curriculum with other teachers and with students to maximise learning (Hartzell 2002 p.4). 

 

The power of information literacy models to guide and support student learning is immense.  Working in a PYP school, I was aware of guided inquiry and how students drive their own learning through questioning, research and creating links to their own lives.  From reading about information literacy models specifically, I gained insight into the importance of thoughtfully structuring the research process (Herring 2012).  Building on my research of constructivist learning theory for Blog task 2 (Blaich, K. 2013 d) I discovered that the theory required practical implementation.  Information literacy models, such as Herring’s PLUS and Kuhlthau’s ISP meaningfully scaffold learning in a practical, tailored, accountable way.  In my opinion, the use of these models show how influential TLs can be, improving academic outcomes by enriching the learning experiences of students using empirically researched and sound pedagogy.

 

 

As “advocates and anchors in a coruscating sea of literacies” (Blaich, K. 2013 d) TLs are poised, ready to revolutionise how education is delivered.

 

 

References

 

Bennett, S.(2009). Libraries and Learning: A History of Paradigm

Change. Portal: Libraries and the Academy 9(2), 181-197. The Johns Hopkins University Press. Retrieved August 12, 2013, from Project MUSE database.

 

Blaich, K. (a) 2013 Retrieved from:

https://kblaich.wordpress.com/2013/07/18/up-the-north-face-with-a-cup-of-tea/

 

Blaich, K. (b) 2013 Retrieved from:

http://interact.csu.edu.au/portal/site/ETL401_201360_W_D/page/c7a1ac36-6184-4989-80a5-5a0b9ed45ca6

 

Blaich, K. (c)2013 Retrieved from:

https://kblaich.wordpress.com/2013/07/31/the-role-of-the-teacher-librarian-with-regard-to-the-convergence-of-literacies-in-the-21st-century/

Blaich, K. (d) 2013 Retrieved from:

https://kblaich.wordpress.com/2013/09/12/information-literacy-is-more-than-a-set-of-skills/

 

Frey, T.  (n.d.) The future of libraries: beginning the great transformation 

Retrieved from:

http://www.davinciinstitute.com/papers/the-future-of-libraries/ 

 

Gilman, T. (2007) The four habits of highly effective librarians. The Chronicle of

Higher Education.  Retrieved from: http://chronicle.com/article/The-Four-Habits-of-Highly-E/46544/

 

Hamilton, B. J. (2011). The school librarian as teacher: What kind of teacher are

you? Knowledge Quest, 39(5), 34-40.

 

 

Hartzell, G. (2002). What’s it take? Knowledge Quest (27) Retrieved from

http://search.proquest.com/docview/194726580?accountid=10344

 

Herring, J. E. (2007). Teacher librarians and the school library. In S. Ferguson

 (Ed.)Libraries in the twenty-first century: charting new directions in information (pp. 27-42). Wagga Wagga, NSW: Centre for Information Studies, Charles Sturt University.

 

Hay, Lyn and Todd, Ross J. (2010) School libraries 21C: the conversation

begins.  Scan; v.29 n.1 p.30-42; Retrieved from http://search.informit.com.au.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/fullText;dn=183676;res=AEIPT

 

 

Haycock, K. (2007). Collaboration: Critical Success Factors for Student

Learning. School Libraries Worldwide, 13(1), 25-35.

 

Kuhlthau, Carol C., Maniotes, Leslie K. & Caspari, A. K. (2007). Guided inquiry:

learning in the 21st century school. Libraries Unlimited.  Westport CT.

 

 

Lippincott Lippincott, Joan K. (2012) Information Commons: Meeting Millennial’s

Needs, Journal of Library Administration, 52:6-7, 538-548,

DOI: 10.1080/01930826.2012.707950

 

 

Oberg, D. (2006) Developing the respect and support of school administrators

Teacher Librarian 33 (3) Pro Quest Central

 

Purcell, K. (2012) Libraries 2020.  Imagining the library of the (not too distant)

future. Pew Internet & American life project.  Annual conference.  Retrieved from http://interact.csu.edu.au/portal/site/ETL401_201360_W_D/page/5cd1eb75-0348-452b-80ad-072e8a8e0d7a

 

Purcell, M. (2010). All Librarians Do Is Check Out Books, Right? A Look at the

Roles of a School Library Media Specialist. Library Media Connection, 29(3), 30-33.

 

Valenza, J. Valenza, J. (2010) A Revised Manifesto. Retrieved from

http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/  

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Swinging from rope with large portmanteau attached…

I can see the summit and lordy do I just want to get there but here’s the thing – have the large portmanteau attached and I’m swinging in mid air trying to get ahead with the reading and the understanding and the synthesis and the creation of something intelligent – when really what’s between my earholes at the moment feels something like styrofoam balls in a golden syrup soup.  Light, slightly warm, deviod of any intelligent thought and sticky.

The large case is filled with all the content I must cover between now and the end of the course and  I know I can lighten my load by reading things and discarding them down the mountain of ETL 401 (not very environmentally friendly but this is just a trite metaphor after all) -ho hum.

So reading on Kuhlthau’s ISP and am smitten (too much?) by the idea of information processing as being at its core an emotional exercise – well that’s what I am taking from it so far.  I think she’s on the money here – that anxiety (a la portmantetau) of not having the scope, talent, time and mental agility to solve the problem that you have either stumbled upon or have been given!  It is nice to know that by reading up on all this theory we can directly link it to our studies – we are the lab rats!  

Metacognition is great though isn’t it!  Looking at all this information and how it frames what we are doing and how we are following the ISP!  Becoming aware of how important the exploration and formulation phase is and find myself proding myself into movement out of the “death zone” (Everest…) by knowing that the more I read the better able I will be to formulate a direction, hone the research and generally get better at what I am supposed to be writing!  So even though my instinct is to do damage control and quickly get to the point, there is merit in just plodding through the reading, putting one foot in front of the other, and assessing how things are going and planning where to put the next foot.

What is blurry now will crystalise, the portmanteau will become perhaps a cheeky little sequinned clutch and we will take the summit by storm!  Either that or altitude sickness has set in and I am in a state of delusion!!  No!  Onwards and upwards!

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